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HAVE YOU EVER THOUGHT ABOUT RUNNING FOR OFFICE?

Not happy with the pace of reforms in government? You can complain. You can vote. You can volunteer for candidates you support. Or, you can run for office yourself! You don’t need to have an advanced degree, years of experience, or a close relative who works for the Democratic party. 

Of course you can jump right in and run for congressional, statewide, county or local office but to get your feet wet, we’d suggest first running for local office here in Easttown. We also strongly recommend that you read over the following to help your decision making: 

There are many organizations providing resources, training manuals, online help and boot camps on how to run for any level of office. Here are a few:

  • Candidate Boot Camp – offers online candidate training and free resources to people who want to serve their fellow citizens but don’t have the budget to hire professional campaign consultants and staff.
  • EmergeAmerica – teaches Democratic women the cutting edge campaign tools they need to run and win.
  • Emily’s List Run to Win – national recruitment and training campaign focused on helping pro-choice Democratic women around the country run for office—and win. 
  • National Democratic Training Committee – Free training for all Democrats and Progressives. In-person and online.
  • Progressive Change Committee – helping progressives run and win since 2009 with cutting-edge training, campaign-in-a-box technology, networking opportunities, and strategic support.
  • Run for Something – works exclusively with progressive millennials ages 35 or younger who are first- or second-time candidates running for local offices (school board, city council, county commissioner, etc).
  • Running Start – trains young women to run for public office.
  • She Should Run – works to dramatically increase the number of women considering a run for public office.
  • Veterans Campaigns – Non-partisan, non-ideological organization whose mission is to prepare veterans to run for office.
  • VoteRunLead – trains women to run for office and win. 

To help you plan for the future, we encourage you to review the upcoming elections for the next several years in the chart below, as well as review the various short job descriptions and salaries of the different offices. If you are interested in running for any of these offices as a Democratic candidate, please contact us at [email protected] and we’ll try to provide assistance or answer any of your questions. 

START PLANNING TO RUN FOR OFFICE NOW!

Upcoming Elections

 OFFICE
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
2028
2029
2030
NATIONALPresident of the United States
X
X
United States Senator (1 of 2)
X
X
United States Senator (1 of 2)
X
X
United States Representative (6th District)
X
X
X
X
X
STATEGovernor
X
X
X
Lieutenant Governor
X
X
X
Attorney General
X
X
Auditor General
X
X
Treasurer
X
X
Senator in General Assembly (26th District)
X
X
X
Rep. in General Assembly (167th District)
X
X
X
X
X
Justice of the Supreme Court
X
X
X
X
X
Judge of the Superior Court
X
X
X
X
X
Judge of the Commonwealth Court
X
X
X
X
X
COUNTYCommissioners
X
X
District Attorney
X
X
Prothonotary
X
X
Recorder of Deeds
X
X
Register of Wills
X
X
Sheriff
X
X
Treasurer
X
X
X
Controller
X
X
X
Clerk of Courts
X
X
X
Coroner
X
X
X
Judge of the Court of Common Pleas (if vacant)
X
X
X
Magesterial District Judge (Dist. 15-1-02)
X
X
Judge of Elections (1 per precinct)
X
X
X
Inspector of Elections (1 per precinct)
X
X
X
TOWNSHIPBoard of Supervisors
X-2
X-2
X-1
X-2
X-2
Board of Auditors
X-1
X-1
X-1
X-1
X-1
Tax Collector
X
X
X
Constable
X
X

IMPORTANT DATES FOR CANDIDATES PLANNING TO RUN IN 2021

February 16 – First day to circulate and file nomination petitions for Primary.

March 9 – Last day to circulate and file nomination petitions for Primary.

March 10 – First day to circulate and file nomination papers for Primary.

March 24 – Last day for withdrawal by candidates who filed notation petitions for Primary.

MAY 18 – PRIMARY ELECTION. Voting booths are open from 7AM to 8 PM.

August 2 – Last day to circulate and file nomination papers for General Election

August 9 – Last day for withdrawal by candidates nominated by nomination papers.

August 9 – Last day for withdrawal by candidates nominated at the General Primary.

November 2 – GENERAL  ELECTION. Voting booths are open from 7AM to 8PM.

Note: All dates on this page are subject to change without notice by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of State, Bureau of Elections & Notaries. See their calendar page of important election dates.

IF YOU WANT TO RUN FOR EASTTOWN TOWNSHIP OFFICES

In Easttown Township, you can run for elected offices that either manage local township government OR manage local elections. 

ELECTED POSITIONS TO HELP MANAGE EASTTOWN – You can run for either Easttown Township Supervisors (5 positions), Township Auditor (3 positions), Tax Collector (1 position), or Constable (1 position). We urge you to either attend or watch the public meetings to learn more about the various offices and their functions by visiting Easttown.org. All of these positions are part-time.

  • Township SupervisorsThe 2021 election will select two supervisors. Easttown Township, is governed by a five member Board of Supervisors. The Supervisors, who are all elected at large, serve staggered terms of six years with elections occurring in odd years (2021, 2023, 2025, etc.) The Board plays a crucial role in deciding issues of public safety, spending, growth management, zoning, roads and streets, code enforcement, environment and how to pay for it all. Learn more about Easttown Township Supervisors. Detailed information about how townships operate in Pennsylvania and the role of the Supervisors is available in the March 2018 Pennsylvania Township Supervisor’s Handbook. Though part-time, being a Township Supervisor requires a major commitment of time. 
    • Marc Heppe and James Oram, who are the two of the five current supervisors up for reelection, are Republicans who have not yet indicated whether they will be running for reelection when their term expires in 2021. 
    • Alex Bosco and Erik Unger, both Democrats, have indicated they will be running in the Democratic 2021 Primary.

OfficeNext ElectionRepresentative
Board of Supervisors2023Betsy Fadem (R)
Board of Supervisors2021Marc C. Heppe (R)
Board of Supervisors2021James W. Oram (R)
Board of Supervisors2025Michael Wacey (D)
Board of Supervisors2023Beth D’Antonio (D)


  • Township AuditorThe 2021 election will select one auditor. Auditors are elected officials who serve staggered six-year terms. They are responsible for conducting the annual audit of township finances. As permitted by law (Section 917 of the Pennsylvania Second Class Township Code), the Board of Supervisors may contract with a certified or competent accountant or firm to conduct the audit, according to generally accepted principles of accounting. The Audits for the Easttown Township, Easttown Municipal Authority, and Easttown Library and Information Center are performed by Maillie, LLP. The elected auditors set the compensation, including paid time off, of any township supervisors that are employed by the township. Learn more about Easttown Township Auditors. 
    • Neil Dombroski, who is the only one of the three current auditors up for reelection is a Democrat who has not yet indicated whether he will be running for reelection when his term expires in 2021. 
    • Erik Borjeson, a Democrat, has indicated he will be running 2021. announced yet.  

  • Tax CollectorThe 2021 election will select one tax collector. Easttown has one elected tax collector who serves a four year term. While the Chester County Treasurer collects real estate taxes, the tax collector also collects certain special township assessments. In addition, they can be appointed to collect certain taxes levied under the Local Tax Enabling Act, such as the per capita and local services taxes. Learn more about Easttown Taxes. 
    • Evans Pancoast, the current tax collector, is a Democrat and will not be running for re-election in 2021
    • Valinda Garcia, a Democrat, has indicated she will be running in 2021.

  • Constable The 2021 election will select one constable. Easttown has one constable who serves a six year term. The constable is an officer of the court with the primary responsibility of delivering subpoenas, summons, divorce papers, etc. on behalf of the court, transporting prisoners, and keeping the peace at polling sites. Constables are often retired police officers or veterans. Learn more here and from the Chester County Constable Handbook.
    • Harrison Chaess is the current constable and will be running for reelection when his term expires in 2021. 

ELECTED POSITIONS TO HELP RUN EASTTOWN ELECTIONS – In Pennsylvania, three of the five people who run each polling place on Election Day are elected officials themselves. These positions — the Judge of Election and Inspectors of Election — will next be on the ballot in 2021. Members of an Election Board share a common goal to make sure the polls are operating properly and that everyone who is eligible to vote is able to do so. They are required to be fair and impartial in performing their duties, irrespective of their party affiliation or personal biases. Their workloads are minimal except during the Spring Primary and Fall General Election. All Election Board members are expected to be inside a polling place throughout Election Day (7AM to 8PM). Each of the seven precincts in Easttown should have three election officers who serve four year terms: a Judge of Elections, a Majority Inspector, and a Minority Inspector. Read How to Become an Election Official in Pennsylvania.

  • The Judge of Elections has the ultimate responsibility for the conduct of a polling place and the personnel working there. He or she must take an oath to admit only those voters who are properly registered and entitled to vote, to prevent fraud, deceit or abuse, and to make sure that all votes at the end of the day are accurately tabulated. The Judge is also responsible for opening and closing the polls, and for all the paperwork required on Election Day. There is one Judge of Elections for each of the seven precincts in Easttown Township. Detailed Job Description
    • Two current Democratic Judges of Elections, Peter Liu in Precinct 2 and Craig Long in Precinct 3, have decided not to run for reelection.
    • The following Democrats have announced they will be candidates: Chaska Levy in Precinct 1; Don Raible in Precinct 2; Marilyn Furfari in Precinct 3; Scott Carpenter in Precinct 5; and Stacey Rohrbeck, member of the Easttown Township Democratic Committee, in Precinct 7.
    • We need Democratic candidates to run in Precinct 4 and 6. Please think of running!
  • The Majority and Minority Inspectors are responsible for checking voters’ registration documents and preparing certificates to authorize voters to cast their ballots. They ensure that the voting process is legal and administered fairly by verifying the signatures of voters as they sign the poll book (the big book on the table with the names of voters). The Inspectors are also responsible for checking to be sure the voting machine numbers are accurate at the end of the day. Detailed Job Description
    • Two current Democratic Inspectors, Elaine Jenkins-Wacey in Precinct 1 and Ann Rothmann in Precinct 2 have decided not to run for reelection.
    • The following Democrats are running for reelection or first time election: Farha Vasanwala in Precinct 1; Kristine Adams, member of the Easttown Township Democratic Committee, in Precinct 2; Deborah Dooling in Precinct 3; Margaret Dalesandro, member of the Easttown Township Democratic Committee, in Precinct 4; Virginia Simon, member of the Easttown Township Democratic Committee, in Precinct 5; Maria Jo Fitzgerald in Precinct 6; and John Juzbasich in Precinct 7.

Precinct
Polling LocationJudge of ElectionsInspectors of Elections
1

Beaumont School
575 Beaumont Road
Sally Bridwell (R)Judith Risk (R)
Elaine Jenkins-Wacey (D)
2
UMLY
116 Berwyn Paoli Road
Peter Liu (D)Ann Rothmann (D)
3
Easttown Library
720 1st Avenue
Craig Long (D)Marilyn Furfari (D)
4
Devon Elementary Cafeteria
400 S. Fairfield
Marilyn Sprague (R)
Margaret Dalesandro (D)
5
Trinity Presbyterian
640 Berwyn Avenue
Sandra Concannon (R)
Virginia Simon (D)
6
St. John’s Presbyterian
217 Berkeley Road
Sue Butler (R)Vacant
7
Devon Elementary Gym
400 S. Fairfield
Karen Sarkissian (D)
Stacey Rohrbeck (D)

ELECTED POSITIONS TO TE SCHOOL BOARD

The Tredyffrin-Easttown (TE) School Board has 9 school board members who serve 4-year terms. Elections occur in odd years for open positions (2021, 2023, etc.) Easttown residents live in Region 3 of the TE School District. 

In November 2021, there will be two school board seats currently held by Democrats (Tina Whitlow and Mary Garrett Itin who will not be running again) up for election representing Easttown residents (Region 3). Please consider running if you’re interested in education and children! 

Please consider getting involved and run for school board if you are a Democrat and passionate about public schools and education. As a board member, you’ll contribute your unique talents to make a difference in our children’s education. While collaborating and working as a team with other board members, you’ll help set the vision and goals for the district; adopt policies that give the district direction to set priorities and achieve its goals; hire and evaluate the superintendent; and adopt and oversee the annual budget. 

Read over this terrific Guide for School Board Candidates in Pennsylvania for an overview about school boards and the role of elected school board members.  If interested, we encourage you to start attending the regular TE School Board meetings and contact your local Precinct Committee Person. The sooner you start the better your chances! Email us at [email protected] if you’re interested in learning more.

OfficeNext ElectionRepresentative
School Board – Region 32023Sue Tiede (D)
School Board – Region 32021Mary Garrett Itin (D)
School Board – Region 32021Tina Whitlow (D)
School Board – Region 22021Kyle Boyer (D)
School Board – Region 22023Michele Burger (D)
School Board – Region 22023Stacy Stone (D)
School Board – Region 12021Scott Dorsey (D)
School Board – Region 12023Roberta Hotinski (D)
School Board – Region 12023Todd Kantorczyk (D)

IF YOU WANT TO RUN FOR CHESTER COUNTY OFFICES

Nine elected offices manage Chester County’s administrative and courthouse and administrative functions. These offices are often referred to as “Row Offices” because, at one time, their offices were historically located “in a row” along the courthouse building in West Chester, PA.  

All are elected for four-year terms in staggered elections occurring in odd years (2021, 2023, 2025, etc). With the exception of the District Attorney, the only qualifications for office are that a candidate be at least 18 years of age and have been a county resident for one year.  

Below  is a description of the duties and services performed by each of the nine Row Offices as well as salaries.  

  • The Clerk of Courts ($74,380 annual salary) is the chief clerk and record keeper for the criminal division of the Court of Common Pleas. The office, with about 25 people, is responsible for maintaining records of all criminal cases, posting bail docketing all criminal records, assessing costs and fines for criminal cases, collecting monies on summary appeal cases, preparing forms for PennDot relating to motor vehicle offenses and filing forms related to the transfer of roads to a municipality. 
    • Up for election in 2021. 
    • The current Clerk of Courts is Yolanda Del Krol who is a Democrat and will be running again in 2021. 
  • The Controller ($74,380 annual salary) is the chief financial officer of the county and is responsible for overseeing the county’s fiscal affairs. The Controller’s office of some 34 employees maintains accounting records and is responsible for the internal audit function which assesses the adequacy of controls and good business practices. The Controller also prepares the county’s annual financial report and all related public documents. 
    • Up for election in 2021. 
    • The current Controller is Margaret Reif who is a Democrat and will be running again in 2021. 
  • The Coroner ($74,380 annual salary) investigates the cause and manner of death of anyone whose death is sudden, accidental, violent or of a suspicious nature. The coroner performs autopsies, conducts inquiries, and determines the cause of death. This office also maintains related records and handles the personal effects of the deceased.
    • Up for election in 2021. 
    • The current Coroner is Christina VandePol who is a Democrat and will not be running again in 2021. 
    • Sophia Garcia-Jackson, a Democrat, and the current Deputy Coroner, has indicated that she will be running for Coroner.
  • The Treasurer ($74,380 annual salary) collects and deposits all monies that come into the county, including real estate taxes, as well as managing investments and debt. The office employs about 20 people and also issues dog, hunting, fishing boat and pistol licenses as well as permits for bingo and small games of chance. 
    • Up for election in 2021. 
    • The current Treasurer is Patricia Maisano who is a Democrat and will be running again in 2021. 
  • The Register of Wills ($74,380 annual salary) has jurisdiction over the probate of wills, the appointment of personal representatives and is also the agent for collection of state inheritance and estate taxes. The office also acts as Clerk of the Orphans’ Court which is the official keeper of court records having to do with adoptions, guardianship of minors and incapacitated persons, and issuance of marriage licenses. The combined offices have about 20 employees. 
    • Up for election in 2023. 
    • The current Register of Wills is Michelle Vaughn who is a Democrat and has not yet indicated whether she will be running again in 2023. 
  • The County Sheriff ($74,380 annual salary) is the chief law enforcement officer of the county courts. The Sheriff’s Department has about 60 employees and is responsible for the transportation of prisoners to and from the court, maintaining security at the courthouse, and serving all of the civil complaints filed by the county courts. 
    • Up for election in 2023. 
    • The current Sheriff is Fredda Maddox who is a Democrat and has not yet indicated whether she will be running again in 2023. 
  • The District Attorney ($191, 926 annual salary) has a statutory responsibility to prosecute criminal offenses. The department’s attorneys provide legal representation for the Commonwealth at all hearings in criminal matters including appeals, probation and parole violation hearings. The office, of approximately 50 employees, also provides advice to police and county departments in matters related to criminal investigations and prosecutions. 
    • Up for election in 2023. 
    • The current District Attorney is Deb Ryan who is a Democrat and has not yet indicated whether she will be running again in 2023.
  • The Prothonotary ($74,380 annual salary) is the legal custodian of all civil records filed with the Court of Common Pleas. The office has about 25 employees who have the responsibility for maintaining the accuracy and security of papers filed in the office and for making them available to the public. They are also responsible for processing U.S. passports. 
    • Up for election in 2023. 
    • The current Prothonotary is Debbie Bookman who is a Democrat and has not yet indicated whether she will be running again in 2023. 
  • The Recorder of Deeds ($74,380 annual salary) records, maintains and preserves permanent legal documents such as deeds and mortgages and makes them available for public access. The office has about 25 employees and also serves as the collection agent of the realty transfer tax. 
    • Up for election in 2023. 
    • The current Recorder of Deeds is Chris Pielli who is a Democrat and has not yet indicated whether she will be running again in 2023. 

IF YOU WANT TO RUN FOR STATE OFFICES

Pennsylvania has three branches of government with elected officials: the executive branch, the legislative branch and the judicial branch.

  • The Pennsylvania Executive Branch has 5 elected offices to the Pennsylvania executive branch of government and 2 representatives to the Pennsylvania legislative branch of government. In Pennsylvania all members of the executive branch are not on the ballot in the same year: elections for governor and lieutenant governor are held in even years when there is not a presidential election, while the other three statewide offices are elected in presidential election years.
    • Governor ($201,729 annual salary) The current Governor is Tom Wolfe who is a Democrat and due to term limits will not be eligible to run for reelection in 2022. 
    • Assistant Governor ($169,451 annual salary) The current Assistant Governor is John Fetterman who is a Democrat. His term ends in 2022.
    • Treasurer ($167,838 annual salary) – The newly elected Treasurer is Stacy Garrity, a Republican, who will assume office on January 20, 2020 and be up for reelection in 2024. 
    • Auditor General ($167,838 annual salary) – The newly elected Auditor General is Timothy Defoor, a Republican, who will assume office on January 20, 2020 and be up for reelection in 2024. 
    • Attorney General ($167,838 annual salary)The current Attorney General is Josh Shapiro who is a Democrat and was reelected for the term beginning 2020. He will not be eligible to run for reelection in 2024 due to term limits.  

  • The Pennsylvania Legislative Branch, known as The General Assembly, consists of an upper house, the Pennsylvania State Senate with 50 Senators who serve staggered four year terms, and a lower house, the Pennsylvania House of Representatives with 203 Representatives who serve two year terms. Easttown residents are in District 26 for the Pennsylvania State Senate and District 167 for the Pennsylvania House of Representatives.
    • State Senator for State Senate District 26 ($90,335 annual salary) – Easttown Township is in District 26. The current State Senator is Tim Kearney who is a Democrat and has not yet indicated whether he will be running again in 2022.
    • State Representative for State House District 167 ($90,335 annual salary) – Easttown Township is in District 167. The current State Representative is Kristine Howard who is a Democrat and was reelected for a term beginning 2020.

  • The Pennsylvania Judicial Branch is made up of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, the Commonwealth Court, the Superior Court, trial courts known as the Court of Common Pleas and Minor Courts. Cases typically originate in the trial courts and can be appealed to courts higher up in the system. The image below depicts the flow of cases through Pennsylvania’s state  court system. All of the courts have elected judges for 10-year terms except the Minor Court Judges who serve six-year terms. Judges first elected to 10-year terms are required to run in a non-partisan retention election if they wish to continue to serve.  Learn about how judges are elected in Pennsylvania.   

    • SUPREME COURT – The Pennsylvania Supreme Court is the state’s court of last resort. Seven justices serve on the Court and their job is to make the final judgment in interpreting Pennsylvania’s laws and Constitution. The Court has administrative authority over all aspects of Pennsylvania’s judicial system. As of September 2019, five judges on the court were elected in partisan elections as Democrats, one judge was elected as a Republican, and one judge was appointed by a Democratic governor. 
      • Supreme court judges are paid $215,037 annually as of January 2021. 
      • There will be one vacancy in 2021 due to the retirement of Chief Justice Thomas Saylor (R) who will reach the mandatory retirement age of 75 in 2021.
      • Two Democrats have announced campaigning for the one vacancy: Superior Court Judge Maria McLaughlin; Superior Court Judge Carolyn H. Nichols
    • COURTS OF APPEAL – Pennsylvania has two statewide intermediate appellate courts systems: the Pennsylvania Superior Court and the Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court
      • Commonwealth Court – The Commonwealth Court hears civil cases involving state or local government. It is the only court like it in the country. It not only hears appeals, but sometimes sits as a trial court in certain cases brought by or against the Commonwealth, such as a constitutional challenge to a state law or a tax dispute. The court is made up of nine judges who serve 10-year terms (beginning the January after their election and ending on the first Monday of the January 10 years later – only on even-numbered years). The court generally decides cases in three-judge panels and sits in Philadelphia, Harrisburg and Pittsburgh. The Commonwealth Court also functions as a trial court in some civil actions by or against the Commonwealth government and cases regarding statewide elections. 
        • Commonwealth Court judges are paid $202,898 annually as of January 2021. 
        • There will be two vacancies and two terms up for retention in 2021. 
        • Commonwealth Court judges Anne Covey and Renee Cohn Jubelirer must stand for retention election in November in order to remain on the bench. Nearly every statewide justice or judge who has ever run for retention has won. 
        • Four Democrats have announced campaigning for the two vacancies: Philadelphia County Common Pleas Court Judge Lori Dumas; Attorney Amanda Green-Hawkins; Philadelphia County Common Pleas Court Judge Sierra L. Thomas-Street; Allegheny County Court of Common Pleas Judge David Spurgeon
      • Superior Court – The Superior Court is the appeals court for most citizens and businesses. This Court’s decisions have a significant impact on Pennsylvania’s economy and the quality of life of our citizens. Reviews most of the civil and criminal cases that are appealed from the courts of common pleas in the state’s 67 counties. The court’s judges also review and decide on wiretapping applications presented by the state’s attorney general and district attorneys under Pennsylvania’s Wiretapping and Electronic Surveillance Control Act. It is one of the busiest intermediate appellate courts in the country. Superior Court judges John Bender and Mary Jane Bowes must stand for retention election in
        November in order to remain on the bench. Nearly every statewide justice or judge who has ever run for retention has won. 
        • Superior Court judges are paid $202,898 annually as of January 2021. 
        • There will be one vacancy and two terms up for retention in 2021. 
        • Superior Court judges John Bender and Mary Jane Bowes must stand for retention election in November in order to remain on the bench. Nearly every statewide justice or judge who has ever run for retention has won. 
        • Four Democrats have announced campaigning for the one vacancy: Lawyer Jill Beck; Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Deborah Canty; Philadelphia Common Pleas Court  Judge Timika Lane; Lawyer Brian Neft
    • COURT OF COMMON PLEAS – With over 400 judges across the state, the Court of Common Pleas is where most misdemeanor and all felony criminal cases are disposed of, where Orphan’s Court matters are addressed, and where larger civil cases are originated. Family law matters, such as custody, divorce, and support are also addressed at the primary level under the supervision of the Court of Common Pleas for a county. These courts hear criminal and civil cases,including those involving families and children, such as divorce, property division, alimony, child custody and support, paternity and protection orders. They also hear appeals from the lower-level Minor Courts. There are 13 Common Pleas Judges in Chester County.
      • Common Plea judges are paid $186,665 annually as of January 2021. 
      • Two terms in Chester County are expiring in December 2021.
      • Five Democrats have announced campaigning: Carlos Barraza; Julie Foster; Tip McCabe; Alita Rovito; Tony Verwey
    • MINOR COURTS – These courts are the first level of Pennsylvania’s judiciary and are where most people have experience with the judicial system. Examples of cases include: traffic tickets, landlord-tenant disputes and underage drinking. These courts are also responsible for whether serious criminal cases go to the Court of Common Pleas, preliminary arraignments and preliminary hearings, setting and accepting bail except in murder or voluntary manslaughter cases. These courts are presided over by Magisterial District Judges (MDJs) in Pennsylvania counties and Municipal Court Judges in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. MDJs do not have to be lawyers, but they are required to pass a qualifying exam. Learn more about Magisterial Judges in Chester County.  Also be sure to read this important investigative article about problems with the Magisterial Court system in Pennsylvania. 
      • Magisterial judges in Chester County are paid $93,338 annually as of January 2021. 
      • Easttown Township is in District Court 15-1-02. 
      • The Magisterial Judge for Easttown Township is Thomas W. Tartaglio whose term will expire in December 2021. 
      • One Democrats has announced campaigning: Mackenzie Smith
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